Anonymous Ads – Easy, Quick and Not Nosy.


Those who have set up an advertising account with one of the big networks like google will know that it’s not a simple task. If you don’t spend a lot of time filling out forms and going through reams of ‘help’ pages and read a lot, you stand the risk of finding out what you skipped when payment time comes along. Or not… The messages you receive are standard form messages, you’re dealing with a robot, not a human, and you have to wade once again through their terms, conditions and intro pages to figure out what you did wrong.

You could spend many hours on this and still only have scraped the surface. And then if you decide to add another ad company to your portfolio you have to do it all over again! It’s a nightmare worthy of Kafka. Add to this that you have to help the ad agency track everything your users do, for nothing!

Developing Countries Embracing Bitcoin Via Faucets

Teacher coming!

By Ofir Beigel

99Bitocins’ Bitcoin Faucet WordPress plugin is now powering more than 200 Bitcoin sites around the world, allowing more than 2.5 billion unbanked adults from around the world to participate in a permissionless global economy.

The original Bitcoin faucet, created by Gavin Andresen, was a way for new users to experience Bitcoin for free. Today these Bitcoin faucets are still around, only they have changed their purpose from helping people to getting started with Bitcoin into generating revenue through ads for the webmasters that run them.

The First Free Bitcoin Faucet

Gavin Andreson’s faucet was paying 5BTC per day in 2010!

Imagine a faucet giving away 5BTC! That’s what Gavin Andreson’s faucet was paying back in June of 2010. It was his first bitcoin-related coding project and he started it off with ฿1,100. At today’s prices that’s close to $100,000. Your claim of ฿5 would be worth $4,290!

Security Note: Site Gravatars Disabled

We’ve disabled  gravatars (the little avatar icons that show in your profile) because they pose a security threat. Many sites use an avatar service from gravatar.com:

An “avatar” is an image that represents you online—a little picture that appears next to your name when you interact with websites.

A Gravatar is a Globally Recognized Avatar. You upload it and create your profile just once, and then when you participate in any Gravatar-enabled site, your Gravatar image will automatically follow you there.

Apparently the sites using this service load the images using a hash of your address, and this hash can be used to reveal your email address. We believe the small convenience of having a picture follow you around on the web is outweighed by the security risks.

More in this Wordfence.com article.